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Low Creatinine Levels in Urine

Low Creatinine Levels in Urine

The level of creatinine in urine becomes low due to the consumption of a large amount of water. It is usually not caused by any serious medical condition. Find out some more facts about creatinine, and the conditions that can increase its level in the blood and urine, through this WellnessKeen write-up.
Chandramita Bora
Last Updated: Apr 22, 2018
Creatinine is the substance produced from creatine phosphate. Creatinine phosphate is found in the skeletal muscles. It helps the muscles contract. So, the level of creatine phosphate is generally high in people with high muscle mass, as compared to those with low muscle mass.
Creatinine, which is the breakdown product of creatine phosphate is eliminated from the body by the kidneys. So, the level of creatinine in blood is often considered an indicator of how well the kidneys are functioning. If the blood creatinine level is high, it can indicate a problem with the kidneys. A high or low level of creatinine in the urine is usually not caused by any serious medical conditions.
What Does Low Urine Creatinine Level Mean?
A low level of urine creatinine is usually not associated with any major health problems. Drinking plenty of water is the most common factor that can lower the level of creatinine in urine. Water dilutes the urine, and causes the creatinine level to fall. In general, the normal range for urine creatinine levels is 500 to 2000 mg/day. The level of creatinine in blood is considered more important than its level in the urine. Constant or stable blood creatinine level is considered a sign that the kidneys are functioning properly.
The urine creatinine level is generally compared to the level of blood creatinine, in order to find out how well the kidneys are functioning. Experts are of the opinion that low urine creatinine levels are not a cause of concern, if the level of creatinine in blood is normal. The level of creatinine in blood should be more or less stable if the kidneys are functioning normally, as muscle mass does not change from day-to-day. If the level of creatinine in urine is high compared to the blood creatinine level, it can imply that the kidneys are healthy and are working efficiently. On the other hand, if the level of creatinine in urine is low, but that in blood is high, then it may indicate a problem with the kidneys.
The specific test that compares the value of urine creatinine level to the creatinine level in blood is known as creatinine clearance test. A low creatinine clearance value can be associated with kidney disorders, which can be caused by several factors, including reduced supply of blood to the kidneys, blockage of the urinary tract, cancer, and shock. Other conditions that may cause a low creatinine clearance value are, dehydration, liver disease, and heart failure. On the other hand, muscle injuries, strenuous exercises, burns, pregnancy, and hypothyroidism may increase this value.
How to Raise Creatinine Levels in Urine?
The level of creatinine in urine can be easily increased by reducing the intake of water. This will make the urine concentrated, and the urine creatinine level to go up. The consumption of alcohol can affect the urine creatinine level by affecting the functions of the kidneys. So, it is better to avoid alcohol before the urine creatinine test. Like alcohol, certain medications can also adversely affect the ability of the kidneys to excrete this substance. These medications can cause blood creatinine levels to go up, while urine creatinine levels to fall. You can speak to your physician to know more about such medications. Exercise and a healthy diet are some other ways that can help increase the urine creatinine level.
To sum up, you do not need to worry about urine creatinine level as long as your blood creatinine level is normal. But if the level of blood creatinine is higher than what it should be, while the urine creatinine level is low, then consider to get the condition medically evaluated with the help of your physician.
Disclaimer: This WellnessKeen article is for informative purposes only, and should not be replaced for the advice of a medical professional.